Tuesday, November 11, 2014

From SPD's blog:

POW! Which Artwork Landed the Strongest Punch Ever?
by SPD Guest Editor, Steve Brodner

"We asked some of America's most powerful artists which pieces got THEIR blood up the most.
In our choice of going light or strong with graphic commentary in media, quite often the pull is toward stepping lightly and letting the text carry the heavy artillery. Editors and advertisers often prefer the punch to be hidden in the text, leaving the page design, for the sake of keeping the mercantile party polite, to just hint at the force of the subject matter.
The artists below (Edel Rodriguez, Brian Stauffer, Frances Jetter, Mirko Ilic and Peter Kuper) remind us that there are times when the jugular is the preferred target. The gravity of a story can be brilliantly reflected in art that pulls out all stops. I have asked these artists, who are masters of the art of blending graphic beauty with topical awareness and moral conviction to join me in picking a few pieces by THEIR favorite artists who have given them some of their greatest inspiration. And they also selected one of their own pieces."

Complete story here: http://www.spd.org/2014/11/your-3-pixi-asked-three.php


Brad Holland, "The Junkie," 1971, The New York Times, Op-Ed page I discovered this drawing in Graphis Annual (1972). It had such a powerful influence on me, that I decided to pay more attention to my editorial illustration. I was lucky in 1992, to become art director of the same Op-Ed Pages of The New York Times, where I was able to hire Brad Holland to do illustrations for me.





























































My design and illustration for the movie poster "Red and Black"
Directed by Miroslav Mikuljan, Jadran Film, 1985

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Golden Bee - 10 Picks

After returning from judging the 2014 Golden Bee Global Biennale in Moscow (along with Reza Abedini, Jonathan Barnbrook, Eric Belousov, Lech Majewski, and Guta Moura Guedes), as well as opening the show for the SVA NYC subway posters, Steve Heller asked me to choose 10 from the 1300 posters of the Golden Bee show, and to describe why I like them.

You can read more about it here: http://www.printmag.com/daily-heller/bite-of-the-golden-bee/

Below are a series of posters by Kum-Jun Park, which won the Grand Prix:





Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A History of Graphic Design by Guity Novin


Guity Novin, is a painter and graphic designer, who has founded the Transpressionism Movement (Ottawa, 1994). A movement in painting that demands from its viewers to participate in the creation of art through the conduit of their common human memories.

She is also writing A History of Graphic Design, and The History of Graphic Design in Iran. (Both of which are digitally available by chapter.) She has some unusual aspects and good examples from Iran. It's worth visiting the sites. In Chapter 58 of A History of Graphic Design, Novin also includes some samples of the Op-Ed pages during my time as art director at The New York Times.
http://guity-novin.blogspot.ca/2012/04/modern-newspaper-magazine-layouts.html

More of them can be seen here:
https://www.behance.net/gallery/20679521/New-York-Times-Op-Ed-Pages






Friday, October 17, 2014

Ristorante and Bar Del Lago


We designed the visual identity for the Italian restaurant and bar, Ristorante and Bar Del Lago (del lagotranslates to at the lake), two entities under the same roof, at The Broadmoor Hotel.

Below are the logos that we designed to symbolize a lake and ripples on the water.
Collateral design ​includes menus, greeting cards, wine lists, napkins, coasters, patterns, etc. Menus and greeting cards are made with wooden veneer.














Friday, September 19, 2014

Day of Remembrance

Poster for "Day of Remembrance for Victims of Ustase Concentration Camp for Children,
August 1942 - January 1943."


Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Working With Pentagram

I just came across a copy of this logo for the Atheneum Hotel in Chicago. In 1993, I drew this logo for Colin Forbes (Pentagram Partner) and Michael Gericke (at that time, Designer at Pentagram).

Twenty-one years later, it still looks good to me.